Articles Tagged With: Daniel Ettinger

The Importance of Being Earnest at Everyman Theatre

 

When one is in town, one amuses oneself. And if one is in Baltimore, one can amuse oneself by getting tickets to see an uproarious and smart production of Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest now appearing at Everyman Theatre for the holidays. Directed by Joseph W. Ritsch, this high-brow, tongue-in-cheek, comedy chestnut is a delightful romp through town, country, and all sorts of shenanigans. A pleasingly pleasant alternative to all of the elves,

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Sweat at Everyman Theatre

A couple of minutes is all it takes; your life can change just like that. In these unsettling and disturbing times of political unrest and social unease with humanity caught dangling in the balance between civility and annihilation, it is no surprise that Everyman Theatre is once more producing two time Pulitzer Prize-winning dramatist Lynn Nottage. This time it’s her core-shaking production of Sweat, Directed by the company’s Artistic Director,

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The Jungle Book at Imagination Stage

Our story starts deep in the middle of a jungle on one of those dark nights…but listen carefully! And you just might hear the wonderful cry of Imagination Stage’s The Jungle Book as it roars to life for young audiences and audiences’ young at heart! A perfect show for the whole family, The Jungle Book is Directed by Janet Stanford and adapted to the stage by Greg Banks. Based on the story by Rudyard Kipling,

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Review: A Streetcar Named Desire at Everyman Theatre

Luck is believing that you are lucky, and it is high time for Baltimore to have a healthy dose of luck. Rolling through on the rattling rails of a passing street car, the alternating half of The Great American Rep, Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire, has settled into Everyman Theatre and is bringing all the luck Charm City needs to feel good about its theatrical experiences as of late.

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Review: Death of a Salesman at Everyman Theatre

Illusions may shatter but memories stay. And a small man can be just as exhausted as a great one. America’s original play in memory, Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman comes to Everyman Theatre to close out their 25th Anniversary season as a part of The Great American Rep cycle, also featuring Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire. The iconic American drama gets the cycle underway and Directed by Vincent M.

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Review: Outside Mullingar at Everyman Theatre

You can’t live against life and avoid harm by avoiding good. And nothing will remind you of that profound philosophy while simultaneously tickling your funny bone as well as Everyman Theatre’s current production of John Patrick Shanley’s Outside Mullingar. Directed by Donald Hicken, this shadowy Irish comedy is the epitome of balance when it comes to hilariously heartwarming and deeply moving. A touching and tender tale of dying folks living, dying,

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Review: Cherokee at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company

We sometimes think we visit our souls when we enter a museum, take a stroll on a beach, or walk through a forest. We search for a key to connecting with our roots or with reality when we take that drive-by study of unfamiliar culture or lifestyle. Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company‘s new world premiere work, Cherokee by Obie Award-Winning playwright Lisa D’Amour, directed by John Vreeke, seeks to expose the subtext beneath those superficial whims that drive us to seek that connection.

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The Understudy at Everyman Theatre featuring resident company artists Danny Gavigan, Beth Hylton, and Clinton Brandhagen.

Review: The Understudy at Everyman Theatre

Silence is not beautiful. Understudies are not bitter. Silence is a failure of words; silence is defeat. And understudies are real actors that are failed to be recognized in light of a big name draw to a Broadway show. This riveting and uproarious concept, albeit completely true, is wrapped up in Everyman Theatre’s production of Theresa Rebeck’s The Understudy. Directed by Joseph W. Ritsch, this exciting dramadey is more than just a metaplay about real life actors and Kafka.

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